Best 301-999Wh Power Stations/Solar Generators With MPPT

301-999Wh Power Stations/Solar Generators With MPPT Charge Controllers

I recently wrote a post about the best 1-300Wh portable power stations/solar generators that have an MPPT solar charge controller. In this post, we’re going to take a look at and review power stations that have a battery capacity between 301 to 999 watt-hours. For larger power stations, check out this post where I compare and review power stations with a 1kWH battery capacity and larger.

Portable power stations have become increasingly popular in the past couple of years. People are realizing how easy it has become to bring electricity with you out into nature when you go camping outdoors. They’re also great for emergencies like power outages.

Related Post: What Is A Power Station And How Does It Work?

Power and charge all your electronics like phones, tablets, fans, CPAP machines, lights, speakers, or a whole travel trailer like I do with my Goal Zero Yeti 1000.

An MPPT solar charge controller inside of a power station will quickly charge the battery with the help of solar panels, which is why I am only listing power stations that are using MPPT charge controllers.

Let’s take a look at the power stations/solar generators I am going to review and compare today, then we’ll take a closer look at each one.

To help you out as much as possible, I will also recommend compatible solar panels for each of the power stations I review.

You can use the table of contents to navigate the post.

Best 301-999Wh (Watt-Hours) Power Stations With MPPT Charge Controller

SUAOKI 400Wh/120,000mAh Portable Generator Power Station Power Supply with Quiet 300W DC/AC Inverter, 12V Car, DC/AC/USB Outputs for Outdoors Camping Travel Fishing Hunting CPAP Trips
Better
nrgGo 400 Portable Power Station, 411WH Portable Lithium Battery Emergency Power Station, Outdoor Solar Generator, 120V AC Pure Sine Wave Inverter, 12V Car Port, 6mm, USB C PD, USB A Port
ExpertPower Alpha 400 444Wh Lithium Polymer Powered Portable Generator with 400W Inverter, 12V Car Socket, USB Socket and More for Camping and Emergency Use Portable Power Station
Good
MAXOAK Power Station 500Wh 300W Solar Generator MPPT Sine-Wave Wireless Charging Emergency LED Lighting w/ 2AC Outlet 120V,PD 45W USB-C,DC12V Lithium Battery Backup for Outdoor RV Van Travel Camping
Best
Goal Zero Yeti 500X Portable Power Station, 505Wh Portable Lithium Battery Emergency Power Station, Outdoor Solar Generator, 120V AC Pure Sine Wave Inverter, 12V Car Port, 6mm, USB C PD, USB A Port
ROCKPALS 500W Portable Power Station, 540Wh Lithium Battery Solar Generator Backup Power Supply with 110V AC Outlet, 2 DC Port, Car Port, Type C, QC 3.0, Emergency Light for Camping Home CPAP
Watt-Hours
400Wh
400Wh
444Wh
500Wh
505Wh
540Wh
Inverter Rating
300W/600W surge
300W/1200W surge
400W/1000W surge
300W/450W surge
300W/600W surge
500W/1000W
AC Outlets
2
2
3
2
2
2
USB Ports
4
3 (1 USB C PD)
3 (USB A)
5 (4 USB A, 1 USB C PD)
4 (2 USB A, 1 USB C, 1 USB C PD)
4 (1 USB C)
DC Outputs
3 (1 cigarette port)
1 cigarette port
3 (1 cigarette port)
2 (1 cigarette port)
2 (1 cigarette port, 1 6mm)
3 (1 cigarette port)
DC Solar Input
Anderson Powerpole/DC
8mm
5.5x2.5mm
8mm
8mm
5.5x2.1mm
Maximum Input
120W
160W (8mm: 100W, USB C PD: 60W)
6.2A
120W
180W (8mm: 120W, USB C PD: 60W)
85W
Lithium Battery
MPPT Solar Charge Controller
Pure Sine Wave Inverter
USB C
Regulated 12V Port
Can Be Used While Charging
Includes MC4 Adapter
Weight
12.4 lbs
12.3 lbs
10.9 lbs
13.2 lbs
12.9 lbs
12.2 lbs
Size
9 x 5.5 x 9 in
9.3 x 6.5 x 9.7 in
11.9 x 6.8 x 5.3 in
11.6 x 7.5 x 7.7 in
7.5 x 11.3 x 5.8 in
10.2 x 6.7 x 6.3 in
SUAOKI 400Wh/120,000mAh Portable Generator Power Station Power Supply with Quiet 300W DC/AC Inverter, 12V Car, DC/AC/USB Outputs for Outdoors Camping Travel Fishing Hunting CPAP Trips
Watt-Hours
400Wh
Inverter Rating
300W/600W surge
AC Outlets
2
USB Ports
4
DC Outputs
3 (1 cigarette port)
DC Solar Input
Anderson Powerpole/DC
Maximum Input
120W
Lithium Battery
MPPT Solar Charge Controller
Pure Sine Wave Inverter
USB C
Regulated 12V Port
Can Be Used While Charging
Includes MC4 Adapter
Weight
12.4 lbs
Size
9 x 5.5 x 9 in
Better
nrgGo 400 Portable Power Station, 411WH Portable Lithium Battery Emergency Power Station, Outdoor Solar Generator, 120V AC Pure Sine Wave Inverter, 12V Car Port, 6mm, USB C PD, USB A Port
Watt-Hours
400Wh
Inverter Rating
300W/1200W surge
AC Outlets
2
USB Ports
3 (1 USB C PD)
DC Outputs
1 cigarette port
DC Solar Input
8mm
Maximum Input
160W (8mm: 100W, USB C PD: 60W)
Lithium Battery
MPPT Solar Charge Controller
Pure Sine Wave Inverter
USB C
Regulated 12V Port
Can Be Used While Charging
Includes MC4 Adapter
Weight
12.3 lbs
Size
9.3 x 6.5 x 9.7 in
ExpertPower Alpha 400 444Wh Lithium Polymer Powered Portable Generator with 400W Inverter, 12V Car Socket, USB Socket and More for Camping and Emergency Use Portable Power Station
Watt-Hours
444Wh
Inverter Rating
400W/1000W surge
AC Outlets
3
USB Ports
3 (USB A)
DC Outputs
3 (1 cigarette port)
DC Solar Input
5.5x2.5mm
Maximum Input
6.2A
Lithium Battery
MPPT Solar Charge Controller
Pure Sine Wave Inverter
USB C
Regulated 12V Port
Can Be Used While Charging
Includes MC4 Adapter
Weight
10.9 lbs
Size
11.9 x 6.8 x 5.3 in
Good
MAXOAK Power Station 500Wh 300W Solar Generator MPPT Sine-Wave Wireless Charging Emergency LED Lighting w/ 2AC Outlet 120V,PD 45W USB-C,DC12V Lithium Battery Backup for Outdoor RV Van Travel Camping
Watt-Hours
500Wh
Inverter Rating
300W/450W surge
AC Outlets
2
USB Ports
5 (4 USB A, 1 USB C PD)
DC Outputs
2 (1 cigarette port)
DC Solar Input
8mm
Maximum Input
120W
Lithium Battery
MPPT Solar Charge Controller
Pure Sine Wave Inverter
USB C
Regulated 12V Port
Can Be Used While Charging
Includes MC4 Adapter
Weight
13.2 lbs
Size
11.6 x 7.5 x 7.7 in
Best
Goal Zero Yeti 500X Portable Power Station, 505Wh Portable Lithium Battery Emergency Power Station, Outdoor Solar Generator, 120V AC Pure Sine Wave Inverter, 12V Car Port, 6mm, USB C PD, USB A Port
Watt-Hours
505Wh
Inverter Rating
300W/600W surge
AC Outlets
2
USB Ports
4 (2 USB A, 1 USB C, 1 USB C PD)
DC Outputs
2 (1 cigarette port, 1 6mm)
DC Solar Input
8mm
Maximum Input
180W (8mm: 120W, USB C PD: 60W)
Lithium Battery
MPPT Solar Charge Controller
Pure Sine Wave Inverter
USB C
Regulated 12V Port
Can Be Used While Charging
Includes MC4 Adapter
Weight
12.9 lbs
Size
7.5 x 11.3 x 5.8 in
ROCKPALS 500W Portable Power Station, 540Wh Lithium Battery Solar Generator Backup Power Supply with 110V AC Outlet, 2 DC Port, Car Port, Type C, QC 3.0, Emergency Light for Camping Home CPAP
Watt-Hours
540Wh
Inverter Rating
500W/1000W
AC Outlets
2
USB Ports
4 (1 USB C)
DC Outputs
3 (1 cigarette port)
DC Solar Input
5.5x2.1mm
Maximum Input
85W
Lithium Battery
MPPT Solar Charge Controller
Pure Sine Wave Inverter
USB C
Regulated 12V Port
Can Be Used While Charging
Includes MC4 Adapter
Weight
12.2 lbs
Size
10.2 x 6.7 x 6.3 in

Note: Scroll left/right on small screens to view all products in the table.

Overview And Review Of Each Power Station


Suaoki 400Wh Portable Generator

SUAOKI 400Wh/120,000mAh Portable Generator Power Station Power Supply with Quiet 300W DC/AC Inverter, 12V Car, DC/AC/USB Outputs for Outdoors Camping Travel Fishing Hunting CPAP Trips

Check Price at Amazon

Features

The Suaoki 400Wh is one of Suaoki’s many portable power stations. It has a 400 watt-hour battery, a 300W pure sine wave inverter with a 600W surge and is one of the top choices when it comes to maximum input watts.

There are two AC outlets on the side, four USB ports on the front, and three DC outputs with one cigarette port.

The USB ports are rated at 5V, 3.5A which means that they can output almost 18W. There is no USB C port on this model.

It has a great screen that shows not only input watts and battery bars, but output watts in both AC and DC separately. Unfortunately, it doesn’t show the state of charge in a percentage.

Related Post: Best Solar Panels For Suaoki Power Stations

On the opposite side of the AC outlets, you will find two input methods. One DC port and one Anderson Powerpole port. The DC port is used mainly with the included wall charger, while the Anderson Powerpole port is meant to be used with solar panels.

Beneath the inputs, there is a jumping port that lets you start car batteries with the lithium batteries. That’s not very common to find on a power station, but it’s something that can be very useful for people traveling in cars and vans.

There are three buttons on the front, one master button that turns on the power station, one that turns on the DC outputs, and one that turns on the AC outputs/the inverter.

A handle on top makes it easier to transport the solar generator, and four feet underneath takes it off the ground slightly so the whole bottom doesn’t get dirty if placed outside on the ground.

Suaoki advertises that it can be discharged in freezing temperatures but shouldn’t be charged below freezing.

The Suaoki 400Wh weighs 12.35 pounds and measures 9 by 5.5 by 9 inches.

Solar Charging Limitations And Recommendations

Suaoki has put a powerful MPPT charge controller in the 400Wh power station that can handle solar panels rated between 14-40V and up to 10A. It can handle up to 120W input. This makes it compatible with a lot of panels on the market.

The fact that the Suaoki 400Wh has an Anderson Powerpole input can be seen as both a good and a bad thing. Fortunately, Suaoki includes an MC4 to Anderson Powerpole adapter so you can use third-party panels with it directly out of the box.

There are solar panels that come with Anderson Powerpole connectors, and Suaoki makes one option, the Suaoki 100W portable solar panel.

Since the Suaoki 400Wh can handle up to 40V and 10A, you can connect two 18V panels in series if you would like.

Here are a couple of compatible solar panels I recommend for the Suaoki 400Wh: Renogy 50W Flexible, Renogy 50W Eclipse, Renogy 100W, Rockpals 100W, and Renogy 160W.

The 160W panel would be a great choice since it would almost max out the input watts.

Another way to max out the input during the sunny hours of the day is by connecting two 100W panels together in parallel with a MC4 Y branch.

In The Box

Suaoki includes a wall charger, a car charger, an MC4 adapter, and a pair of jump starter clamps.

Conclusion And Review

The Suaoki 400Wh is neither the worst or the best power station on the market with a 400Wh battery. It’s great that it has two AC outlets, several USB and DC ports, an Anderson Powerpole input, and can jump-start a car, but I wish the screen would show the state of charge in a percentage, and that it had a USB C PD port.

Although it’s not the best solar generator in today’s comparison, it’s a power station that will be good enough for most travelers or homeowners that want a battery backup in case the power goes out. It will power smaller electronics like phones, tablets, TVs, lights, laptops, CPAPs, and heated blankets.

Pros

  • Two AC outlets, four USB ports, three DC ports
  • Anderson Powerpole/DC inputs
  • The screen shows input/output watts
  • Jump-start port (includes clamps)
  • Includes MC4 adapter and car charger

Cons

  • Unregulated 12V output
  • No battery percentage on screen
  • No USB C

nrgGo 400 Portable Power Station

nrgGo 400 Portable Power Station, 411WH Portable Lithium Battery Emergency Power Station, Outdoor Solar Generator, 120V AC Pure Sine Wave Inverter, 12V Car Port, 6mm, USB C PD, USB A Port

Check Price at Amazon

Features

The nrgGo 400 is a portable power station from a new company that reminds me a lot of Goal Zero.

Its 400 model has a 400Wh battery capacity and a pure sine wave inverter rated at 300W, 1200W surge. With an inverter of that size, you will be able to power laptops, CPAP machines, TVs, and video game consoles.

On the front, you’ll find two AC outlets, two USB A ports, one USB C PD port, a 12V cigarette port output, and an 8mm input. The 12V port is not regulated.

Each type of port can be turned on and off with a button above the port. There is also a button that lits up the screen.

The USB C PD port is capable of both charging and discharging the battery, which means that you can charge the battery faster by using both solar/wall/car chargers and a USB C PD charger like the RAVPower USB C PD Charger.

It’s a 5-20V port USB C PD port that can handle up to 60W in/out.

NrgGo has put a great useful screen on this power station that shows the input/output watts, state of charge in percentage, and hours to empty/full. Just like on the Goal Zero models, it will give you an estimate of how long you’re going to be able to power a certain device before the battery is empty, or how many hours it will take to charge the battery to full.

A handle on top makes it easier to carry the power station, and it’s on the lighter side at 12.3 pounds.

Solar Charging Limitations And Recommendations

The 8mm input can handle solar panels rated between 13-22V, up to 8A with a 100W max. That means that the battery can be fully charged in four hours with max input.

Since it has an 8mm input, it’s compatible with a lot of panels like the Paxcess 50W, Rockpals 80W Goal Zero Boulder 100, and Suaoki 100W.

NrgGo doesn’t include an MC4 to 8mm adapter, so to use solar panels with MC4 connectors you’re going to need an adapter like this (click to view on Amazon).

Using the MC4 adapter above, you’ll be able to connect solar panels like the Renogy 100W.

You could even connect two Renogy 100W panels with an MC4 Y branch and max the input watts throughout the day for a quick charge.

Note that you can also charge the battery via the USB C PD port, which supports up to 60W input/output. To do this, you need to use a compatible USB C PD charger like the Aukey 60W USB C charger.

In The Box

NrgGo includes the wall charger.

Conclusion And Review

The nrgGo 400 has left a good impression on me for a couple of reasons. I like that it has two AC outlets, two USB ports, a USB C PD that supports in/out, an 8mm input, and a screen that has exactly the information I want from a screen on a power station.

What I am missing is a regulated 12V output, and I honestly don’t understand why they would go all-in with the inverter, screen, USB C PD, and MPPT but skip the regulated 12V output. Sure, if you’re not going to run sensitive 12V devices like a fridge/freezer that doesn’t like to run on low voltages it won’t be a problem, but still.

Pros

  • Two AC outlets, two USB A ports, three USB ports, 12V cigarette port
  • USB C PD with support for 60W input/output
  • 8mm input
  • The screen shows input/output watts, state of charge in percentage

Cons

  • Unregulated 12V output
  • Doesn’t include MC4 adapter or car charger

ExpertPower Alpha 400

ExpertPower Alpha 400 444Wh Lithium Polymer Powered Portable Generator with 400W Inverter, 12V Car Socket, USB Socket and More for Camping and Emergency Use Portable Power Station

Check Price at Amazon

Features

The ExpertPower Alpha 400 has a 444Wh battery capacity and a 400W pure sine wave inverter with a 1000W surge rating.

It has three AC outlets, three USB A ports, and three DC outlets with one unregulated 12V cigarette port.

The USB ports are rated at 5V, 8A max, and the cigarette port is rated at 9-12V and 15A max.

There is no screen on the Alpha 400, but there is a battery indicator with lights next to the on/off switch.

It can be charged in 7 hours with the included wall charger.

Related Post: Solar Panels Compatible With ExpertPower Alpha 400

A neat feature with the DC outputs (although they’re not regulated) is that they’ll automatically sense when you plug something in and turn them on.

There is a handle on top that makes it easy to carry this power station, and it’s the lightest one in today’s comparison at 10.9 pounds.

It measures 11.9 x 6.8 x 5.3 inches.

Solar Charging Limitations And Recommendations

It’s unclear how many input watts the Alpha 400 can handle, but its MPPT charge controller can handle solar panels rated between 13-24V up to 6.2A max. ExpertPower advertises that it takes six hours to charge the battery with a 100W panel, so it should be able to handle at least 75W input.

ExpertPower includes an MC4 to 5.5x2.1mm adapter so it’s compatible with a lot of third party panels.

Using the MC4 adapter above, you’ll be able to connect solar panels like the Renogy 100W.

You could even connect two Renogy 100W panels with an MC4 Y branch and max the input watts throughout the day for a quick charge.

It’s also compatible with solar panels that come with different DC connectors, like the Paxcess 50W, Rockpals 80W, and Suaoki 100W.

In The Box

ExpertPower includes a wall charger, car charger, and MC4 adapter.

Conclusion And Review

The ExpertPower Alpha 400 is the only power station on the list with three AC outlets. It also has the second-largest inverter at 400W. It’s compatible with a lot of different solar panels and will charge relatively quickly.

It will power laptops, TVs, CPAP machines, and everything else that requires less than 400W. I don’t recommend powering 12V fridge/freezers with it due to the unregulated 12V cigarette port.

I like when companies include the MC4 to DC adapter and a car charger, so thumbs up to ExpertPower for doing that.

I wish it had a USB C PD port, a screen, and a regulated 12V output, then it might’ve been my top choice.

Pros

  • Three AC, USB, DC outlets/ports
  • Includes MC4 adapter and car charger
  • Lightweight

Cons

  • Unregulated 12V output
  • No screen
  • No USB C

Maxoak AC50/500Wh Power Station

MAXOAK Power Station 500Wh 300W Solar Generator MPPT Sine-Wave Wireless Charging Emergency LED Lighting w/ 2AC Outlet 120V,PD 45W USB-C,DC12V Lithium Battery Backup for Outdoor RV Van Travel Camping

Check Price at Amazon

Features

The Maxoak AC50/500Wh is a compact modern power station with a 500Wh battery capacity and a 300W pure sine wave inverter with a 450W surge rating.

With a 300W inverter, you’ll be able to power electronics like a CPAP machine, drones, TV, laptop, lights, speakers, and tablets.

I call it modern because it has a wireless Qi charging pad on top of the unit so all you have to do to start charging a supported device is to place it on top.

Two AC outlets, four USB A ports, one USB C PD port, two DC outputs, and one 12V cigarette port can be found on the front of the solar generator. Unfortunately, the 12V cigarette port is not regulated and therefore I don’t recommend powering 12V devices like a fridge/freezer with it.

The USB A ports are rated at 5V, 3A, and the USB C PD port is rated at 45W max.

Related Post: Solar Panels Compatible With Maxoak Power Stations

The Maxoak 500Wh has a screen that will show you the input and AC/DC output watts. It also shows the battery level split up in five bars.

On the back of the Maxoak 500Wh, there is a LED light that is bright enough to light up a tent or a small camper.

Handles on top fold up and down that make it easy to both carry and store.

It’s the heaviest power station on the list today at 13.2 pounds. It measures 11.6 x 7.5 x 7.7 inches.

Solar Charging Limitations And Recommendations

The MPPT solar charge controller in the Maxoak 500Wh can handle solar panels rated up to 40V. I suggest connecting two 100W panels in parallel with an MC4 Y branch.

Maxoak includes an MC4 to 8mm cable so you can use compatible third-party panels.

It can handle up to 120W of input and charge the battery in less than 4.5 hours.

Since it has an 8mm input, it’s compatible with a lot of panels like the Paxcess 50W, Rockpals 80W, Goal Zero Boulder 100, and Suaoki 100W.

If you want to use panels with MC4 connectors, the included adapter will let you use panels like the Renogy 50W flexible, Renogy 50W Eclipse, Renogy 100W, and Rich Solar 190W.

In The Box

Maxoak includes a wall charger, car charger, MC4 adapter, a carrying bag, and a USB C cable.

Conclusion And Review

The Maxoak AC50/500Wh is a great solar generator that can not only handle a good amount of solar input at 120W, but charge your devices quickly with the USB C PD port, and wirelessly with the Qi charging pad on top of the unit.

It’s a little bit odd that it only has a 300W inverter but a 500Wh battery capacity, but it’s probably enough for most people that go camping and only need to power or charge their phones, tablets, speaker, CPAP machines, and laptops. A larger inverter would add more weight.

What’s missing is a regulated 12V cigarette port, and the battery percentage on the screen.

Pros

  • Two AC outlets, four USB ports, three DC ports
  • USB C PD port
  • 8mm input
  • Folding handle
  • The screen shows input/output watts
  • Includes MC4 adapter, car charger, USB C cable
  • Wireless charging pad
  • LED light

Cons

  • Unregulated 12V output
  • No battery percentage on screen

Goal Zero Yeti 500X Power Station

Goal Zero Yeti 500X Portable Power Station, 505Wh Portable Lithium Battery Emergency Power Station, Outdoor Solar Generator, 120V AC Pure Sine Wave Inverter, 12V Car Port, 6mm, USB C PD, USB A Port

Check Price at Amazon

Features

The Goal Zero Yeti 500X is one of Goal Zero’s new power stations in 2020.

It has a 505Wh battery capacity and a 300W pure sine wave inverter with a surge rating of 600W.

With a 300W inverter, you can power devices like laptops, TVs, tablets, lights, heated blankets, small mixers, speakers, and CPAP machines. It won’t power larger kitchen appliances, heaters, microwaves, ovens or air conditioners.

There are two AC outlets, four USB ports, and two DC outputs. The input is an 8mm port.

The USB ports are two USB A ports rated at 5V 2.4A, and two USB C ports. One USB C port is a PD port capable of outputting up to 60W. Since it’s a PD port it can also be used to charge the Yeti battery with a USB C PD charger like the Aukey 60W USB C charger.

Related Post: Use Any Solar Panel With Goal Zero Yeti Power Stations

Goal Zero has addressed and fixed an issue that has been a problem with earlier Yeti Lithium models, and that is the 12V cigarette port. It used to be unregulated, then Goal Zero started selling an adapter that was supposed to regulate the port, but some still had issues with it not being regulated properly.

Now they have added a regulated 12V cigarette port, so you can use 12V devices like a fridge/freezer until the Yeti battery runs out and not have the fridge turn itself off because it senses a low voltage at 50% or more/less.

The screen on the Yeti displays the same great information found on a lot of other Yetis. Input/output watts, output amps, battery voltage, watt-hours used, state of charge in percentage and bars, and time to empty/full. It’s a great screen with all the useful information you could ever ask for from a portable station like this.

A handle on top folds down (similar to the Yeti 400 Lithium) which makes it easy to store the Yeti.

The Goal Zero Yeti 500X weighs 12.9 pounds and measures 7.5 by 11.3 by 5.8 inches.

Solar Charging Limitations And Recommendations

Since the Yeti 500X has an 8mm input, it’s compatible not only with most of the Goal Zero solar panels, but a lot of the portable foldable panels on the market as well that come with different DC connectors.

What you have to think about when connecting solar panels to a Goal Zero Yeti is the input voltage limit. A sticker on the unit tells us that it has a 22V limit that should not be exceeded. It is, however, unclear whether this limit talks about the Voc or Vmp rating. Goal Zero told me it’s the Voc rating, but their own Boulder 100 panel has a Voc rating of 22.5V, which makes it extra confusing.

I recommend staying below 22V Voc to be on the safe side since Goal Zero could tell you that it won’t honor the warranty if you’ve connected incompatible panels.

Panels that are compatible straight out of the box are the Paxcess 50W, Rockpals 80WSuaoki 100W, Goal Zero Boulder 100, and Goal Zero Nomad 100.

If you want to use third party solar panels with MC4 connectors like the Renogy 100W, you need to use an adapter like this to connect it to the Yeti (click to view on Amazon).

In The Box

Goal Zero includes the wall charger.

It sells the car charger separately (click to view on Amazon).

Conclusion And Review

Goal Zero has fixed the complaints a lot of people had with the Yeti 400 Lithium, and there is not a lot to complain about with the new Yeti 500X.

It’s a great power station for people that go camping, both on the weekends and fulltime, that want to be able to power electronics like phones, tablets, TVs, CPAP machines, and laptops.

As the Solar Addict, I appreciate being able to charge batteries fast with solar, and you will be able to do that with the 120W (8mm) + 60W (USB C PD) input ports.

If you want to be able to use the power station throughout the day while it’s being charged with either solar power or the wall charger, the Yeti 500X is one of the best choices.

One of my favorite features is the screen that has a lot of information so you can monitor what’s going on. It was one of my complaints about the smaller Yeti 200X, so I am glad they put it on this model.

So what is it missing? Well, a larger inverter. A 1000W inverter in the Yeti 500X would’ve been amazing. Then you would’ve been able to power a small coffee maker and other small kitchen appliances.

With a 300W inverter, it shouldn’t be plugged into a camper or run desktop computers, so even a 500W inverter would’ve been a big upgrade. At least they’re using a pure sine wave, and no other 500Wh power station has a 1000W inverter, so I am nitpicking.

I also wish that Goal Zero would include a faster wall charger, a car charger, and an MC4 adapter.

Overall, the Yeti 500X is the best power station around 500Wh on the market today. With a powerful MPPT charge controller, USB C PD, a very useful screen, a regulated 12V port, and compact design, it’s a combination of features that together beats every other power station on the list.

It doesn’t have the most battery capacity, the largest inverter, or the most ports, but it has the features that I am looking for in a portable power station of this size.

Pros

  • Two AC outlets, four USB ports, two DC ports
  • USB C PD port
  • High maximum input (180W)
  • 8mm input
  • Folding handle
  • The screen shows input/output watts, output amps, watt-hours used, battery percentage, time to empty/full

Cons

  • The inverter is only 300W
  • No MC4 adapter or car charger is included

Rockpals 500W Portable Power Station

ROCKPALS 500W Portable Power Station, 540Wh Lithium Battery Solar Generator Backup Power Supply with 110V AC Outlet, 2 DC Port, Car Port, Type C, QC 3.0, Emergency Light for Camping Home CPAP

Check Price at Amazon

Features

The Rockpals 500W is the power station with the most battery capacity and the most powerful inverter on the list today. It has a 540Wh battery capacity, and a pure sine wave inverter rated at 500W/1000W surge.

It has two AC outlets, although only one of them is grounded. There are also three USB A ports, one USB C port, three DC outputs, and a light on the front. Two of the USB ports are 5V 2.4A, one is QC 3.0, and the USB C has a max 18W output.

A screen tells you the battery level in both bars and percentage, the output watts, hours to empty, and the ports that are active. It will also give you overload and temperature warnings.

Related Post: Solar Panels Compatible With Rockpals Power Stations

The DC outputs are one cigarette port and two 5.5x2.1mm ports. If you’re going to use a CPAP machine with the Rockpals, Rockpals sells a DC converter (click to view on Amazon) that is compatible with the S10 CPAP series.

Each output type has a button above it so you can turn on and off the ones you want to use. The LED light is turned on with a small button on the front as well.

There is a 5.5x2.5mm DC input on the front of the solar generator, and Rockpals includes an MC4 to DC adapter so you can use third-party solar panels.

A folding handle on top makes it easy to carry and store the Rockpals 500W.

It weighs 12.2 pounds and measures 10.2 by 6.7 by 6.3 inches.

Solar Charging Limitations And Recommendations

The Rockpals 500W has an MPPT charge controller inside that supports solar panels rated between 12-24V. Fortunately, they include an MC4 to DC adapter so you can use third-party panels from companies like Renogy, HQST, Newpowa, and Windynation without buying additional adapters.

Its max input is 90W, although you will probably see between 80-90W when using solar panels due to their voltages.

If you have lost the MC4 adapter that came with the Rockpals, this is the kind you need (click to view on Amazon).

There are also a lot of portable panels that come with a 5.5x2.5mm connector/adapter, like the Paxcess 50W, Rockpals 80W, and Suaoki 100W.

If you want to use panels with MC4 connectors, the included adapter will let you use panels like the Renogy 50W flexible, Renogy 50W Eclipse, Renogy 100W, and Eco-Worthy 120W.

It’s possible to use two solar panels connected in parallel with an MC4 Y branch. Since the maximum input is 90W, what would make sense to do is connect two Sungoldpower 60W solar panels together.

In The Box

Rockpals includes a wall charger, car charger, and an MC4 to DC adapter.

Conclusion And Review

If you’re looking for the power station with MPPT and the most powerful inverter around 400-500Wh, the Rockpals 500W is it.

Its MPPT charge controller is an okay one, with a maximum of 90W input and support for panels up to 24V. The ports are also okay, with two AC outlets (only one grounded for some reason), several USB and DC ports.

Rockpals has done a great job with the battery capacity, the inverter, and the screen, but falls short on the max input, USB C port, and the unregulated 12V cigarette port.

An updated version with a USB C PD port that supports both charging and discharging, a regulated 12V cigarette port, and an MPPT charger like the one in the Suaoki or Maxoak would put this power station on the top.

Pros

  • Two AC outlets, four USB ports, two DC ports
  • USB C port
  • Common DC input
  • Folding handle
  • The screen shows output watts, battery percentage/bars, time to empty

Cons

  • Unregulated 12V output
  • 90W maximum input
  • Weak USB C port (18W max)

Conclusion And Recommendations

My recommendations are based on what I believe are the most important and essential features of a power station/solar generator.

Which power station is the best for you depends on what you need and prioritize. What do you need to power and for how long? Do you need to be able to charge the battery quickly, or is it fine if it takes several hours?

You need to consider what devices you want to be able to power and for how long before you decide what power station to buy.

Here are my recommendations.

Good

Maxoak AC50/500Wh Power Station

MAXOAK Power Station 500Wh 300W Solar Generator MPPT Sine-Wave Wireless Charging Emergency LED Lighting w/ 2AC Outlet 120V,PD 45W USB-C,DC12V Lithium Battery Backup for Outdoor RV Van Travel Camping

Check Price at Amazon

The Maxoak 500Wh doesn’t have the most battery capacity, the largest inverter, or a regulated 12V cigarette port, but it has a lot of outputs, a fast MPPT charge controller that supports 120W input, a common charging port, and a wireless charging pad on top.

It also has a screen that makes it easy to monitor what is going on, and the only thing missing fro the screen is the battery percentage.

It’s a power station that will do the job for most people that want a portable battery to power and charge their electronics like a phone, tablet, laptop, lights, CPAP machine, and TV.

I also have to give Maxoak a thumbs up for including a wall charger, car charger, USB C cable, and MC4 adapter.

Better

nrgGo 400 Portable Power Station

nrgGo 400 Portable Power Station, 411WH Portable Lithium Battery Emergency Power Station, Outdoor Solar Generator, 120V AC Pure Sine Wave Inverter, 12V Car Port, 6mm, USB C PD, USB A Port

Check Price at Amazon

The nrgGo 400 is a top pick in today’s comparison due to its screen, outputs, and maximum input.

It has a screen that gives you the input/output watts, battery percentage, and time to empty/full. If I had to make a guess what information most people want from a screen on a portable power station, that would be it.

The maximum input is 160W thanks to the USB C PD port that can handle 60W input/output on its own.

If nrgGo had put a regulated 12V output on this unit, it would’ve been harder to choose a winner between this and my top choice.

Best

Goal Zero Yeti 500X Power Station

Goal Zero Yeti 500X Portable Power Station, 505Wh Portable Lithium Battery Emergency Power Station, Outdoor Solar Generator, 120V AC Pure Sine Wave Inverter, 12V Car Port, 6mm, USB C PD, USB A Port

Check Price at Amazon

The winner in today’s comparison is the Yeti 500X.

It has the best screen, most useful USB ports, a regulated 12V output, and the highest maximum input.

You can send 120W into the 8mm port and 60W into the USB C PD port, and still have another USB C port to charge devices with. The regulated 12V cigarette port output makes it great for 12V fridge/freezers and other 12V devices.

I wish Goal Zero would include an MC4 to 8mm adapter and a car charger, but since they’re the Apple of power stations I don’t see that happening anytime soon.

Overall, it’s the complete package and the best power station right now around this size. What could’ve made it even better would be a larger inverter.

Frequently Asked Questions

How Long Does It Take To Charge A Power Station?

It depends on the size of the battery and the input wattage. If a power station has a 500 watt-hour capacity and you’re using a 100W panel that generates about 70W, it would take approximately 7-8 hours since 500/70=7.14.

It won’t be exactly 7.14 hours since most battery monitoring systems and charge controllers slow down the charge when it reaches 80-90%. Therefore, I suggest adding another hour or two to the charging speed calculation for a more accurate number.

What Is A Wh (Watt-hour)?

A watt-hour is the power consumption of one watt for one hour. If you have a device with a power brick that says 60W, that means that it will at most use 60 watt-hours in one hour.

A 500Wh battery would run a device drawing 500W for an hour at most. Usually less due to inverter efficiency.

How To Calculate How Long A Power Station Will Run A Device?

To figure out how long a power station will run a specific device, you can use the battery capacity in watt-hours and how many watts the device requires.

For example, if you have the Goal Zero Yeti 500X and want to power a laptop like a new Macbook that requires 60W, you can use either the USB C port or the AC outlets.

If we use one of the AC outlets, we’re going to lose some power due to the inverter efficiency. A common inverter efficiency number is 85%. So for an accurate number, we should take that into account.

Now, 505/60=8.42 hours. Then 8.42*0.85=7.16 hours. So according to our calculation, the Yeti 500X with a 505Wh battery capacity will power a 60W device for a little more than 7 hours.

If you have no idea how many watts your device requires, it can often be found on its power brick or the device itself. Googling the name of the device and adding “power consumption” to the search query also works sometimes. If you can’t find it anywhere and want to know before you purchase a specific power station, you can use a P3 Kill A Watt (click to view on Amazon).

Whenever you have the possibility to use the DC or USB ports, you should, because they’re more efficient than the AC outlets powered by the inverter.

Why Does It Matter If A 12V Cigarette Port Is Regulated?

An unregulated 12V cigarette port follows the voltage of the battery. So if a 12V fridge has a low-voltage cutoff to protect the fridge from voltages that could possibly damage the compressor, it will stop cooling the fridge when the power station reaches a certain battery percentage/voltage.

A regulated 12V cigarette port will continue to output the same voltage even if the battery percentage of the power station is at 5%.

If you’re going to be powering a 12V device that you need to rely on, I recommend choosing a power station with a regulated 12V port.

How Can I Improve The Charging Efficiency When Using Solar Panels?

You can tilt the panel so they’re facing the sun. This will make a big difference and increase charging efficiency. It will be especially important when the sun is low on the horizon in the morning/evening. It also helps on cloudy days.

What Do PWM And MPPT Stand For?

PWM stands for Pulse Width Modulation, MPPT stands for Maximum Power Point Tracking.

Do Power Stations Need Ventilation?

There are components that need air, like the charge controller and the inverter, therefore I don’t recommend storing a power station that is being used in a small storage compartment where there is no air circulation.

Please leave a comment down below if you have any questions or corrections.

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